music

Akademia Live- December 4, 2014 @ 8 PM

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Welcome to Akademia Live, where award-winning artists in diverse musical genres take the stage to bring their original music straight to the people. There are no second-takes. There are no slick post-production effects. There’s only the artist, theirs songs, and the crowd. It doesn’t get any more live than Akademia Live.

Sol Night Club
Thursday, December 4, 2014 @ 8 PM
www.solvenue.com
313 E. Carson St.
Los Angeles, California 90745

See award-winning artists Nxus, Lisa Trindade, Lotis, Dalal, Millennium and others take the stage for one epic night of live performances. DJ’s will be spinning the hottest club hits before and after the live sets. Akademia drink specials all night.

Admission: Free (Password ‘Akademia’)
Ages 21 & over only. Dress code: Club chic.

Akademia Live Flyer 12-4-14

Beckman Media Company- The Leading Provider of Media Business News

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February 28, 2014

By Glen Rupert

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Beckman Media Company, one of the top media industry news providers based in Los Angeles, California, introduces their new rebranded site Beckman.tv, providing a streamlined view of the most pertinent news affecting the media business today.

Beckman.tv presents the latest ground-breaking news from nearly every media industry sector, including telecommunications, Internet, film and music. With the same incisive reporting and analysis that has become the trademark of Beckman Media, the new site enables viewers to access content anywhere in the globe.

What makes Beckman different from other media business news providers is that they offer an unbiased look at media corporations, business practices and the competitive environment, giving detailed and thorough information to its viewers.

Sylvar- The Site for Entertainment News

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By Cindy Waters

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Sylvar.tv has long been the hottest place to get your fix for juicy celebrity gossip, movie, music, entertainment news and more. From the biggest stars to those new on the scene, Sylvar.tv gives you the most revealing, up-to-the-minute news right at your fingertips!

Visit Sylvar.tv now to get news on the upcoming Bond movie and the sexy Bond girl candidates, plus news on the stealthy stalker that broke into Keanu’s Hollywood Hills home. Also, check out the summer’s best beach bodies and the hot new music artists of 2014.

If you have a hot tip, article, photo or video relating to a brand new or rising entertainment star, please feel free to contact our editors at news@sylvar.tv. We want to hear from you!

Veteran Music Executive Ken Wilson Talks About The Akademia and the Changing Musical Landscape

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From senior posts at Arista Records, Columbia and MCA to J Records and Warner Brothers, veteran record executive Ken Wilson has shaped the careers of legendary artists such as Beyonce, Alicia Keys, Whitney Houston, Mariah Carey, Michael Jackson, Seal, Sade, George Michael and many more, leading to record sales in excess of $2 Billion.

 

 

Ken Wilson started his career in music at Arista Records. There he worked with acclaimed artists Whitney Houston, Aretha Franklin, Billy Ocean, Taylor Dayne and Kenny G. Ken continued his journey on to Columbia Records where he served as Senior Vice President of Radio Promotions. He became responsible for the success of artists such as Mariah Carey, Maxwell, LL Cool J, George Michael, Kriss Kross, DaBrat, Slick Rick and more. He then went on to MCA Records as President of Urban Music where he oversaw operations in the urban music division, signing KC & JoJo of Jodeci, Rahsaan Patterson, Anthony Hamilton, coordinated the success of Mary J Blige’s ‘Share My World’ album and New Edition’s ‘Home Again’.

Ken Wilson’s reputation then brought him to J Records where he reported directly to Clive Davis as Senior Vice President of Urban Music. Once again, Ken played a key role in the success of artists such as Alicia Keys, Luther Vandross, Monica, Busta Rhymes, Mario, Fantasia, Jamie Foxx and Ruben Studdard, to name a few. After a long tenure at J Records, Ken moved to the west coast to serve as Senior Vice President of Urban Music at Warner Brothers Records. There, he was responsible for urban radio airplay and marketing efforts while managing budgets and overseeing field staff. Here he has been instrumental in the careers of Seal, Eric Benet, Mike Jones and V.I.C. of ‘Wobble’ fame.  Ken is continuing to guide successful artists, such as Beyonce, Johnny Gill, Eric Benet, J. Cole, Juicy J and Cee-Lo, through effective marketing and promotions.

“The traditional music business model has changed dramatically over the past twenty years. But while many doors have closed to new artists, many new doors have opened as well. The Akademia brings together the expertise of top record executives and producers to help guide the careers of new up-and-coming artists and groom them for success,” states Ken. “I look forward to The Akademia becoming a major force in the near future.”

The Akademia Music Awards is based in Los Angeles, California and supports musicians interested in receiving a higher degree of market exposure and recognition in the new music business era. As one of the six Akademia board members, Ken concentrates his efforts on the Hip-Hop, R&B and Gospel categories, guiding artists from the earliest stages to commercial success.

You may contact Ken with questions or requests for assistance at ken@theakademia.com

Read more at: http://www.theakademia.com/ken_wilson

The Robot Economy- New Grads Beware

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By Hitesh Patel      

‘If your prospective job involves learning a set of logical rules or a statistical model that you apply to task after task, it is ripe for replacement by a robot.’        

Congratulations! You’ve worked hard for four years, slogging through endless lectures, study groups, tests and, of course, countless embarrassing drunken blowouts, to emerge a victorious new graduate. Your future couldn’t possibly look any brighter, right? Well, the problem is that while you were toiling away the past four years at your studies so that you could land a plum job, so were millions of computer programmers also toiling worldwide. Their work, however, was of a decidedly different nature- making sure the plum entry level jobs that you might have stepped into become automated so that their employers can use that money towards what they deem to be more important ends.

Don’t feel too bad, though. This is the continuation of a trend that began with the first programmable machines and has only gained momentum. While it may seem like cause for despair, it is not. It is a call to adapt. Frank Levy of MIT and Richard Murane of Harvard, a pair of economists who have studied the impact of automation on human employment, describe this next phase as the ‘Grand Restructuring’. Simply put, if your prospective job involves learning a set of logical rules or a statistical model that you apply to task after task, it is ripe for replacement by a robot. As computing power continues to increase and programmers continue to innovate, there are very few occupations that will fall outside of this category. Levy and Murane predict the surviving jobs will be of three kinds: solving unstructured problems, working with new information, and carrying out non-routine manual tasks. It is hard to imagine a robot that could plot corporate strategy, design buildings, fix plumbing problems or style hair for instance.

Sanjiv Singh, a longtime faculty member of the Robotics Institute of Carnegie Mellon University, provides a viewpoint from inside the robotics field. According to Singh, robotic devices can relieve people of jobs that are dull, dangerous or dirty, whether those jobs are on mind-numbing assembly lines or in unpleasant environments, like clearing land minds or welding on the ocean floor. They can also enhance people’s ability to performs tasks. Yet the worrisome step is when robots go from assisting human workers to making them obsolete.

One view from outside the field comes from someone in the creative arts. Stryker, singer-songwriter with pop rock group Millennium, eschewed a lucrative corporate position long ago to pursue a creative path. ‘We were helping to implement a company-wide software system designed to integrate virtually every department’s function, from product development to inventory management. I came to understand through this experience that the jobs we held (even executive-level ones) could eventually be rationalized down to a complex but definable decision tree and then automated. That raised an interesting philosophical question about the meaning of such work. Music, art, film, literature, or poetry could never be meaningfully automated by machines. I think that says a lot about the uniqueness of those occupations. It also seems plausible that it will be the creative community that charts…Read the full article at: http://whoismillennium.com/press_room/the_robot_economy_new_grads_beware/